The Telegoons

Tele-Goonography...

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Contents of this Chapter:
Introduction...
British Isles...

The Antipodean Islands (New Zealand)...
Australia...

Film Credits...


  Introduction...

Twenty six of the original Goon Show scripts were shortened and re-worked by Maurice Wiltshire, to provide the basis for a series of fifteen-minute puppet films entitled The Telegoons. The original musical interludes were deleted, and Wallace Greenslade's announcing parts were mostly taken over by Hercules Grytpype-Thynne (see Puppets section). Taking advantage of the visual nature of television, frequent snippets of visual humour were added in place of the Goons Show's mind pictures.

The first episode of The Telegoons hit the British Broadcasting Corporation's television airwaves on Saturday October 5th, 1963. The New Zealand Broadcasting Corporation followed suit on Monday August 17th, 1964. The original UK BBCtv broadcasts of The Telegoons were telecined from 24 fps 35 mm film prints to 405 lines. I believe it's possible, however, that the New Zealand and other overseas broadcasts of the series may have been telecined from 16 mm film prints.

Not much happened with The Telegoons after the initial broadcasts. UK fans of the show were left with two more years of the comic strip in TV Comic, two Mountain Films 8 mm home movies, and for those fortunate to live within hailing distance of Leeds in the UK, rental of 16 mm film prints. The North East branch of the Goon Show Preservation Society of Great Britain (GSPS), under the guidance of Bill Horsman, were regular customers of the rental company's 16 mm Telegoons episodes. Some of these film showings involved the GSPS North West branch as well. One such occasion was the GSPS Second North West Annual Convention, held on the evening of June 2nd, 1984, where two of the episodes were screened—said to be one of the high notes of the evening.

YORCON, the 1979 convention of British science fiction fandom, held in Leeds over the weekend of 13th - 16th April 1979, screened two episodes of The Telegoons in the 'shorts' category (probably from the same film rental company used by the GSPS). Lest you think that The Telegoons sounds a bit far removed from science fiction, they made up for it by also screening several Sci-Fi standards, including 2001

A few years later, in 1986, the film rental company in Leeds that had The Telegoons films was acquired by another larger rental company. Soon afterwards, Bill Horsman got a phone call from his contact at the original company, who said that the precious Telegoons films might end up being dumped, due to a catalogue reshuffle, and would he like to buy them. A reported large bank overdraft later, all twenty-six of the films were acquired, and eventually made their way into the archives of the GSPS. Thus the rumours that the GSPS now owns 16mm film prints of all 26 of the episodes, bought by the Steam Count (a.k.a. Bill Horsman), apparently legitimately, are in fact true. (Note: A contact inside the BBC recently informed me that the BBC's archives still retain eighteen out of  twenty-six The Telegoons episodes on 35 mm. This makes the GSPS holdings larger, even if not as pristine, nor as high-quality due to some loss of resolution in the process of printing down to 16 mm.)

Although not using the original soundtrack, the BBC television show, Telly Addicts, apparently showed a video clip from The Hastings Flyer (T.G. s01e09) episode of The Telegoons, sometime in late 1987.

Another Telegoons film was screened at the October 1997 annual convention of the GSPS (Son of a Weekend Called Fred), which was held in Brighton, of Phantom Head Shaver fame.

A further The Telegoons episode, China Story, was screened (from an MPEG1 video transfer) 5th July 2003 at the GSPS GREAT Grandson of a Weekend called Fred convention held in Egham, Surrey.

back to top  


British Isles...

The Telegoons -- 1st Series
Radio Times schedule: BBCtv (405 lines) at 1740 on Saturdays.

#

Broadcast

Title & Synopsis

Original Goon Show

1
1963-10-05
The Ascent of Mount Everest [15:33]
s01e01

GSPS 16 mm print footage 520.1' (14:26 @24 fps; 13:52 @25 fps) (2 splices)
GSPS PAL videotape:
14:56 @ 25 fps

Main plot:
To win £10 million, Ned Seagoon must sing "Rule Britannia" with piano accompaniment, on the top of Mount Everest, but can't remember the words. 

Sub-plot:
Members of the 1953 Everest expedition, Grytpype (presumably Hillary) and Moriarty (presumably Tensing), make the dramatic discovery that someone has beaten them to it. Just two minutes from the summit, they find a tent containing one upright grand piano, one large gas stove, one marble washstand, one iron mangle, one six foot brass bedstead, one corrugated iron airing cupboard, and one galvanised zinc bath, left there in 1901 by intrepid Telegoons mountaineers, Neddie Seagoon, Bloodnok, Henry Crun, Bluebottle, and Eccles. Grytpype and Moriarty agree to keep news of their discovery from the world. 

Points of Interest: A production still from this episode, in colour, is presented in the Film Production section. 

This episode was the basis for the official children's story and colouring book of the same name, published by Tonwen Ltd., 1964. (See Merchandise section)

This episode was also released as the 8 mm home movie, Ascent of Everest, by Mountain Films Ltd., circa 1964. (See Merchandise section)

The original 3rd-series Goon Show broadcast, The Ascent of Mount Everest, was inspired by the real life Everest expedition which was in progress at the time. The stars of this expedition, Sir Edmund Hillary and Tensing Norgay, reached the summit 31 days later. Of course ten years after that, when the radio script was rewritten for the Telegoon puppets, Hillary and Tensing's success was a well known fact, and a library still of Tensing flying the flags on the summit is actually used in this episode. The Telegoons' discovery of a tent, filled with just about every household convenience one could imagine, addressed the real-life question of whether Hillary's expedition found any evidence of prior expeditions, and in particular the 1924 expedition of George Mallory and Andrew Irvine. Mallory and Irvine were last seen a few hundred meters from the summit. The debate as to whether Mallory may have preceded Hillary to the top was fueled by the discovery of Mallory's body in 1999. In a recent interview (Forbes.com, New Peaks to Climb, by James Clash, Oct 1, 2000), Sir Edmund Hillary was asked to cast his mind back to the summit of Mount Everest. He said, "There are two things I remember clearly, even in the short time I was there. One is that I did look around a bit to see if there was any sign of remnants of Mallory. I didn't expect there to be, of course, after all those years. And there wasn't."

3/24
(SM & LS, JG ed.)
2
1963-10-12

The Lost Colony
Introducing
the
TELEGOONS
The Lost Colony [15.04]
s01e02

GSPS 16 mm print footage 535.4' (14:52 @24 fps; 14:16 @25 fps) (2 splices)
GSPS PAL videotape:
14:28 @ 25 fps (the VHS runtime includes approximately 7 seconds of missing dialogue at the start)

Seagoon, hereditary owner of Manhattan, exacts a dreadful revenge which reduces a great city to its original value, namely a piece of knotted string, a plastic lettuce, a Mickey Mouse watch, and a wax impression of Florence Nightingoon's teeth.

Points of Interest: This episode is a modified (and heavily cut) version of the 33:00 pilot film of the same name. Made three years earlier at a cost of £20,000 in private money, the pilot secured funding from the BBC for production of the series. The puppeteers on the pilot were Ron Field, Joan Field, and Ann Field (all of whom were uncredited in the broadcast version). Only one of the pilot puppeteers, Ann Field, was a puppeteer on the series. 

Continuity for the pilot was done by director Tony Young's wife, Doreen Dearnaley (uncredited). 

One of three "assistants" employed to help with changes to the pilot film for broadcast was puppeteer Joan Garrick, of Space Patrol (UK) fame. Joan contributed her puppeteer skills to the 1:40 Christopher Columbus opening sequence (opening sketch), which sets up the plot and provides a quick laugh or two to warm up the audience. A 10 second linking scene with Grytpype-Thynne in his soon-to-be-familiar role as announcer, manipulated by John Dudley (uncredited), was added at the end of the Columbus sequence. Based on the success of this composite opening sequence, a similar format was used to good effect on all subsequent episodes in the series.

A surviving script of The Lost Colony's complete opening sequence is entitled 'Tales of Manhattan' (Opening Sequence). For reasons unknown this name was either not intended for the modified pilot film, or was dropped. In any case, the pilot's original title, The Lost Colony, was retained for the broadcast episode. 

The title sequence for this episode says that it was produced by Wendy Danielli, in association with Tony Young. This simply reflects that it was Wendy who arranged the private financing of the pilot. However, after funding for the series was obtained from the BBC, all subsequent episodes were produced by Tony Young, with Wendy Danielli as associate producer.

All evidence suggests that the pilot film's soundtrack was in fact the radio Goon Show recording, The Sale of Manhattan (G.S. s06e11) (which, by-the-way, was announced on that show as "The Lost Colony"). One fairly reliable source, the Radio Times Guide to TV Comedy (see Bibliography section), says it is thought that The Telegoons used extracts from the original BBC recordings of the radio Goon Show. Since no amount of listening has shown any commonality, this rumour probably arose from the way that the pilot film was made, and does not apply to the episodes which followed, all of which have newly recorded soundtracks based on Maurice Wiltshire's rewrites of the original radio scripts. In any case, it is unlikely that the Goons would have recorded a one-off soundtrack for the pilot (see discussion in the Misconceptions section), particularly since pilot puppeteer Ann Field remembers director Tony Young planning to "make a killing" by reusing the Goon Show recordings (thereby saving the huge cost of rerecording them). Ann also recalls that the pilot was shot using a dialogue tape with the Goons' voices. She also confirmed that the pilot film was something like 33 minutes long, and that, "The [relatively slow] speed of the puppet movement was the main concern for all," all of which rather clinches the matter. To further strengthen this assumption, I have done a trial edit of the first few minutes of The Sale of Manhattan Goon Show radio recording, and have not been too surprised by how well it matches the film footage in the 1963 broadcast episode.

Nevertheless, the largest modification of the pilot film was not the addition of an opening sequence, nor was it the deletion of more than 18 minutes of footage. Nor was it the changes to the credits. Instead, sometime in early 1963, the old 1960 soundtrack was replaced with a newly recorded one that better took into account the speed of the puppets, also providing uniformity of style with the other episodes. The difficulties of synchronizing the dialogue with the pre-existing film footage (which don't exist if the dialogue is recorded first) were exacerbated by the Goons' tendency to ad lib. For similar reasons it must also have been difficult to match up Peter Sellers' dialogue for the first eight episodes filmed, which due to his delayed arrival at the voice recording sessions, had been done by a stand-in. To Peter's credit, after the dialogue recordings for the remaining episodes were completed, he went back and re-recorded his parts for the first episodes (see the Film Production section). I can only imagine the effect this must have had on the dubbing department! 

Notes: The difficulties of matching dialogue to pre-existing film footage have also been touched on in Part 3 of The Goons The Story, although discussed there out of the correct historical context (see Bibliography section).

The missing footage at the start of the GSPS PAL VHS tape for this episode contains the following dialogue: 

PETER: In this tiny ship...in that great ocean...Christopher Columbus, a poor Italian navigator, made (a discovery which changed the entire course of.)

One of the later episodes of The Telegoons, Napoleon's Piano (s01e04), has an out-of-place scene showing Ned with feathers behind his ears, at sea in a zinc bath (3:37 to 4:49), which clearly belongs in The Lost Colony (at 7:00, just before Ned arrives in New York). Clearly this 1:12 of footage was part of the pilot film, and was cut when the pilot was reduced from its original 33 minute length down to the 15 minutes required for the series. Since the original dialogue in this scene is intact, it would be possible to restore some closer semblance to the pilot by adding back this scene, and removing the opening sequence. (The sound track would have to be reverted too). Also see the points of interest for Napoleon's Piano, below. It is possible that further research will identify other "transplanted" scenes cut from the pilot film.

6/11 (SM)
3
1963-10-19
The Fear of Wages [15:02]
s01e03

GSPS 16 mm print footage 536.8' (14:54 @24 fps; 14:18 @25 fps) (4 splices)
GSPS PAL videotape:
14:26 @ 25 fps

Ned Seagoon's missing regiment is owed £33 million in back pay and interest, but red tape and nitroglycerine prevents them from collecting.

Points of Interest: Some production pictures from this episode are presented in the Film Production section. The same hut prop appears again in The Africa Ship Canal (s02e11).

A copy of the original shooting schedule for this episode is shown at the end of the Film Production section.

Loosely based on Henri-Georges Clouzot's gripping 1953 film noir, The Wages of Fear. which concerns transporting nitroglycerin across dangerous terrain on the back of a lorry. 

6/25 (SM & LS)

(see BBC Radio Collection CD, The Goon Show #20)
4
1963-10-26
Napoleon's Piano [14:53]
s01e04

GSPS 16 mm print footage 534.7' (14:51 @24 fps; 14:15 @25 fps) (3 splices)
GSPS PAL videotape:
14:18 @ 25 fps

Ned is duped into moving a piano from one room to another for £5...only to find that the piano is in the Louvre Museum in Paris, and must be brought back to England!

Points of Interest: The scene (3:37 to 4:49) showing Ned with feathers behind his ears, at sea in a zinc bath, where he meets Eccles in a floating gas stove, who asks, "How far are we from America?" is clearly out of place. Conversely, this 1:12 scene fits perfectly into the broadcast version of The Lost Colony, and was obviously one of several cuts made to the 33 minute pilot film version of The Lost Colony, some of which were reused. 

What makes this scene stand out is that Ned is supposed to be in the English Channel, but the dialogue indicates that he's in the middle of the Atlantic! The very least we could do with this sloppy edit would be to restore it back to its correct position in The Lost Colony, which would improve the continuity of both episodes!!! The correct position to restore it in the broadcast episode of The Lost Colony (s01e02) is at 7:00, just before Ned arrives in New York.

This episode was released as an 8 mm home movie by Mountain Films Ltd., c.1964. (See Merchandise section)

6/4 (SM)

(see BBC Radio Collection CD, The Goon Show #2)
5
1963-11-02
The Last Tram [15:11]
s01e05

GSPS 16 mm print footage 544.3' (15:07 @24 fps; 14:30 @25 fps) (1 splice)
GSPS PAL videotape:
14:35 @ 25 fps

Inspector Seagoon thinks that all London's trams were melted down into melted down trams ten years ago, but there is still one on Clapham Common...

Point of Interest: Based on the real-life dismantling of municipal tramway systems in the UK during the early 1950s. 

5/9 (SM & ES)

(see BBC Radio Collection CD, The Goon Show #8)
  1963-11-09 (No broadcast due to the Festival of Remembrance)
6
1963-11-16
The China Story (14:33)
s01e06
Footage: 1310'  35 mm
Run-time: 13:59 @ 25 fps
(Based on the BBC PasB log for the 1964-08-16 repeat)

BBC 35 mm print footage 1310' (14:33 @24 fps; 13:58 @25 fps)
GSPS 16 mm print footage 520.5' (14:27 @24 fps; 13:52 @25 fps) (several splices)
GSPS PAL videotape:
13:56 @ 25 fps (35 mm +6 s)

British Ambassador Ned Seagoon has to get a certain rosewood upright piano overland to the Great Wall of China.

Points of Interest: This was the first all-new episode produced for The Telegoons series, and was made immediately after the Tales of Manhattan opening sequence (see notes for The Lost Colony). 

Continuity for The China Story was to have been Doreen Dearnaley (dir. Tony Young's wife, who had previously done continuity for The Telegoons pilot film) but when an opportunity came along to do continuity on a bigger project (probably Wolf Rilla's 1963 movie, Cairo), she bowed out and recommended her friend Doreen Soan for the position. Doreen Soan accepted the job and went on to do continuity for all episodes.

5/17 (SM & ES)

TG film credits SM only

7
1963-11-23
The Canal (15:07)
s01e07
BBC PasB log details:
23 November 1963
17.39.43 - 17.53.47 [= 14:04 @ 25 fps. Based on the footage, it appears that the end credits were omitted from this broadcast. The run-time of the entire film is 14:31 @ 25 fps]
The Telegoons: The Canal (16/63/0307)
Source: Grosvenor Films
Footage 1361' Sound 35 mm

BBC 35 mm print footage 1361' (15:07 @24 fps; 14:31 @25 fps)
GSPS 16 mm print footage 542' (15:03 @24 fps; 14:27 @25 fps) (1 splice)
GSPS PAL videotape:
14:33 @ 25 fps

The story told using stills from the film

Ned Seagoon, adopted son of one of the adopted wives of famous amateur brain surgeon Lord Grytpype-Thynne, returns home after forty-three years at college.

Point of Interest: Ann Field, one of the puppeteers, made Neddie's scarf for The Canal. She also made him wet, and changed his clothes for all his scenes in this episode. Nowadays these tasks would probably be done by a 'dresser'.

5/6 (SM)
  1963-11-30 (The Choking Horror was scheduled, but was postponed to allow the premiere episode of a new series called Doctor Who to be repeated prior to the 2nd episode)
9
1963-12-07
The Hastings Flyer (15:07)
s01e09
[14:31 @ 25 fps]
Footage: 1361'  35 mm
(Based on the BBC PasB log for the 1964-09-12 repeat)

BBC 35 mm print footage 1361' (15:07 @24 fps; 14:31 @ 25 fps)
GSPS 16 mm print footage 538.3' (14:57 @24 fps; 14:21 @25 fps) (2 splices)
GSPS PAL videotape:
14:30 @ 25 fps (35 mm +10 s)

Intrepid Neddie Seagoon battles through ice and snow to foil the wicked train robbers Grytpype-Thynne and Moriarty.

Points of Interest: Some production pictures from this episode, several of which are in colour, are presented in the Film Production section. 

This was the first episode filmed with Ron Field's electronic puppet lip-synch system.

6/15 (SM)
10
1963-12-14
The Mystery of the Marie Celeste-Solved (15:14)
s01e10
BBC PasB log details:
14 December 1963
17.39.35 - 17.54.12 [= 14:37 @ 25 fps]
The Telegoons: The Mystery of the Marie Celeste - Solved (16/63/0310)
Source: Grosvenor Films
Footage 1371' 

BBC 35 mm print footage 1371' (15:13 @24 fps; 14:37 @25 fps)
GSPS 16 mm print footage 544.1' (15:06 @24 fps; 14:30 @25 fps) (no  splices)
GSPS PAL videotape:
14:38 @ 25 fps (35 mm +7 s)

A £5,000 reward is offered for the solution of the mystery of the Marie Celeste, so with the aid of a duplicate Marie Celeste, Neddie Seagoon investigates (and solves) this famous sea mystery.

Point of Interest: Despite over-use of "Ahoy!" and "Pull up a bollard", this episode is loosely based on the historical mystery, which to this day has still not been solved.

5/8 (SM & ES)

(see BBC Radio Collection; The Goon Show #8)
11
1963-12-21
The International Christmas Pudding (15:07)
s01e11

BBC PasB log details:
21 December 1963
17.40.26 - 17.54.56 [= 14:30 @ 25 fps]
The Telegoons: The International Christmas Pudding: (16/63/0310)
Source: Grosvenor Films
Footage [1361' --log says 1461', clearly a typo] Sound 35 mm

BBC 35 mm print footage 1361' (15:07 @24 fps; 14:31 @25 fps)
GSPS 16 mm print footage 535' (14:51 @24 fps; 14:15 @25 fps) (14 or more splices near start)
GSPS PAL videotape:
14:33 @ 25 fps (35 mm +16 s)

In the year 2000 B.C. the International Christmas pudding was destroyed and its fragments scattered the length and longth of the known world. A certain Welsh steamer called Ned searches for one of the missing portions in darkest Africa.

Point of Interest: On this same evening, in the time slot preceding The Telegoons, Doctor Who (episode title: The Survivors) first comes face-to-face with his principal adversaries, The Daleks.  

6/9 (SM)

(see BBC Radio Collection CD, The Goon Show #2)
8
1963-12-28
The Choking Horror (15:08)
s01e08
[14:32 @ 25 fps]
Footage: 1362'  35 mm
(Based on the BBC PasB log for the 1964-09-05 repeat)

BBC 35 mm print footage 1362' (15:07 @24 fps; 14:31 @25 fps)
GSPS 16 mm print footage 540.1' (15:00 @24 fps; 14:24 @25 fps) (3 or 4 splices)
GSPS PAL videotape:
14:33 @ 25 fps (35 mm +7 s)

In this tale of Germany's most dastardly secret weapon in the 1914-18 war, Inspector Ned Seagoon is called in to scrutinize a "strange follicular growth" that has infected London's Tower Bridge. 

Point of Interest: Electronic puppet lip-synch.

6/22 (SM)


The Telegoons
-- 2nd Series

Radio Times schedule: BBC-1 TV (405 lines) on Saturdays,
at 1715 (#1-6), 1700 (#7-12, 13 & 15) and 1725 (#14).

#

Broadcast

Title & Synopsis

Original Goon Show

1
1964-03-28
Scradge (15:07)
s02e01
BBC PasB log details:
28 March 1964
17.15.00 - 17.29.35 [= 14:35 @ 25 fps]
The Telegoons: (16/63/0312): Scradge
Source: Grosvenor Films 
Footage 1361' Sound 35 mm

BBC 35 mm print footage 1361' (15:07 @24 fps; 14:31 @25 fps)
GSPS 16 mm print footage 541.4' (15:02 @24 fps; 14:26 @25 fps) (several splices)
GSPS PAL videotape:
14:44 @ 25 fps (35 mm +5 s)

To the pyramids of Egypt goes Britain's Scradge expedition, to seek new deposits before all the boots in Britain explode. Meanwhile, Grytpype-Thynne conducts his own operations from Base Camp III, near Monte Carlo.

Point of Interest
: Mike Fox was upgraded from focus puller to camera operator for this episode, earning his first screen credit. Electronic puppet lip-synch.

6/26 (SM & LS)

(see BBC Radio Collection CD, The Goon Show #7)

TG credits SM only

2
1964-04-04

 

The Booted Gorilla (15:06)
s02e02
BBC PasB log details:
04 April 1964
17.14.58 - 17.29.27 [ = 14:29 @ 25 fps]
The Telegoons: The Booted Gorilla: (16/63/0313)
Source: Grosvenor Films/Television Enterprises 
Footage 1359' Sound 35 mm

BBC 35 mm print footage 1359' (15:06 @24 fps; 14:29 @25 fps)
GSPS 16 mm print footage 537.9' (14:56 @24 fps; 14:20 @25 fps) (0 or 1 splice)
GSPS PAL videotape:
14:33 @ 25 fps (35 mm +10 s)

The story told using stills from the film

Sooner or later, the booted gorilla's footwear will need repairing. So Ned Seagoon, determined to catch the monster, sets a trap in the form of a collapsible shoe repair shop run by Mr. Crun.

5/10 (SM & ES)
3
1964-04-11
The Underwater Mountain (15:07)
s02e03
BBC PasB log details:
11 April 1964
17.16.09 - 17.30.40 [ = 14:31 @ 25 fps]
The Telegoons: The Underwater Mountain: (16/63/0314)
Source: Grosvenor Films/Television Enterprises
Footage 1361' Sound 35 mm

BBC 35 mm print footage 1361' (15:07 @24 fps; 14:31 @25 fps)
GSPS 16 mm print footage 542.9' (15:04 @24 fps; 14:28 @25 fps) (5 splices)
GSPS PAL videotape:
14:40 @ 25 fps (35 mm +3 s)

Determined to play his saxophone on the highest mountain peak in the world and so win £10,000, Neddie Seagoon and company attempt to conquer Mount Fred...a mountain higher than Mount Everest, but underwater.

Point of Interest: John Dudley's fish, starfish and octopus marionettes were used in the underwater scenes. He developed these puppets for his own show, Stars on Strings, with The Dudley Marionettes. They were used in the Neptune's Realm segment. 

4/23 (SM)
4
1964-04-18
The Dreaded Batter Pudding Hurler of Bexhill-on-Sea (15:07)
s02e04
BBC PasB log details:
18 April 1964
17.15.05 - 17.29.37 [= 14:32 @ 25 fps]
The Telegoons: The The Dreaded Batter Pudding Hurler of Bexhill on Sea: (16/63/0330)
Source: Grosvenor Films/Television Enterprises 
Footage 1361' 35 mm

BBC 35 mm print footage 1361' (15:07 @24 fps; 14:31 @25 fps)
GSPS 16 mm print footage 525.8' (14:36 @24 fps; 14:01 @25 fps) (several splices)
GSPS PAL videotape:
14:10 @ 25 fps (35 mm +31 s)

It is wartime on the South Coast of England. Inspector Ned Seagoon is sent to find out who is subjecting the gentle-townsfolk of Bexhill to a reign of Batter Pudding-induced terror.

Point of Interest: Electronic puppet lip-synch.

5/3 (SM)

(see BBC Radio Collection CD, The Goon Show #1)
5
1964-04-25
Tales of Old Dartmoor (15:07)
s02e05
BBC PasB log details:
25 April 1964
17.14.58 - 17.29.29 [= 14:31 @ 25 fps]
The Telegoons: Tales of Old Dartmoor: (16/63/0300)
Source: Grosvenor Films
Footage 1361' 35 mm

BBC 35 mm print footage 1361' (15:07 @24 fps; 14:31 @25 fps)
GSPS 16 mm print footage 536.8' (14:54 @24 fps; 14:18 @25 fps) (2 splices)
GSPS PAL videotape:
14:30 @ 25 fps (35 mm +13 s)

The story of how the famous Dartmoor prison was sunk in a sea battle with the equally famous French Chateau d'If. It is also the story of how Neddie Seagoon, as Governor of one of Her Majesty's Prisons, is duped into moving it to the south of France, leaving in its place a full-sized cardboard replica, which still stands to this day. 

Point of Interest: Electronic puppet lip-synch.

6/21 (SM)
6
1964-05-02
Lurgi Strikes Britain (15:07)
s02e06
BBC PasB log details:
02 May 1964
17.14.55 - 17.29.24 [ = 14:29 @ 25 fps]
The Telegoons: Lurgi Strikes Britain: (16/63/0300) 
Source: Grosvenor Films/Television Enterprises
Footage 1361' 35 mm

BBC 35 mm print footage 1361' (15:07 @24 fps; 14:31 @25 fps)
GSPS 16 mm print footage 534.1' (14:50 @24 fps; 14:14 @25 fps) (no splices)
GSPS PAL videotape:
14:31 @ 25 fps (35 mm +17 s)

A mysterious disease invades Britain. (Yack-a-back-coo!)

Point of Interest: Electronic puppet lip-synch.

5/7 (SM & ES)

(see BBC Radio Collection CD, The Goon Show #2)
7
1964-05-09
Captain Seagoon R.N. [15:07]
s02e07
BBC PasB log details:
09 May 1964
17.00.05 - 17.14.38 [= 14:33 @ 25 fps]
The Telegoons: Captain Seagoon R.N.
(Other PasB details not known)

BBC 35 mm print footage approx. 1364.4' (15:09 @24 fps; 14:33 @ 25 fps)
GSPS 16 mm print footage 537.6' (14:55 @24 fps; 14:20 @25 fps) (no splices)
GSPS PAL videotape:
14:30 @ 25 fps (35 mm +14 s)

The personal narrative of a famous British naval commander who, in the wars with the Dutch, achieved the unique distinction of blowing up his own ship.

Point of Interest: Electronic puppet lip-synch.

7/8 (SM & LS)
8
1964-05-16
The First Albert Memorial to the Moon (15:07)
s02e08

BBC PasB log details:
16 May 1964
17.03.07 - 17.17.40 [= 14:33 @ 25 fps]
The Telegoons: The First Albert Memorial to the Moon: (16/63/0300)
Source: Grosvenor Films
Footage: 1361' 35 mm

BBC 35 mm print footage 1361' (15:07 @24 fps; 14:31 @ 25 fps)
GSPS 16 mm print footage 541.1' (15:01 @24 fps; 14:25 @25 fps) (2 splices)
GSPS PAL videotape:
14:32 @ 25 fps (35 mm +6 s) 

After failing to convince the British Interplanetary Society to sponsor his B2 space rocket project, Professor Seagoon fits rocket motors to one of London's most famous monuments and launches it instead.

4/7 (SM & LS)
9
1964-05-23
The Whistling Spy Enigma [15:07]
s02e09

GSPS 16 mm print footage 537.8' (14:56 @24 fps; 14:20 @25 fps) (no splices)
GSPS PAL videotape:
14:32 @ 25 fps 

In devising a plan to ensure that the English football team defeats the Hungarians, Military Intelligence sends Neddie Seagoon to Budapest, where with the aid of a spy he can identify only by whistling a secret tune, his orders are to mine the boots of the opposing team.

Point of Interest: Electronic puppet lip-synch.
5/1 (SM)

(see BBC Radio Collection CD, The Goon Show #7)
10
1964-05-30
Tales of Montmartre [15:16]
s02e10

GSPS 16 mm print footage 542.2' (15:03 @24 fps; 14:27 @25 fps) (0 splices)
GSPS PAL videotape: 14:40 @ 25 fps

The story of the Eiffel Tower, which unknown to most people, is really a cunningly crafted replica, built after Neddie Toulouse sets fire to the original.

Point of Interest: A copy of the original shooting schedule for this episode is shown at the end of the Film Production section.

One of the few episodes to include the voice of a woman (OoooOoooohhh! Where's my old medical charts!?), probably lent by associate producer Wendy Danielli, who held an Equity card, and was fluent in French. (The radio Goon Show original of the same name, had also featured a woman's voice, that of actress Charlotte Mitchell. So Tony Young was maintaining a venerable Goon Show tradition.)

6/18 (SM & ES)

(see BBC Radio Collection CD, The Goon Show #10)

TG credits SM only

11
1964-06-06
The Africa Ship Canal (15:07)
s02e11
BBC PasB log details:
06 June 1964
17.00.00 - 17.14.31 [= 14:31 @ 25 fps]
The Telegoons: The Africa Ship Canal: (16/63/0300)
Source: Grosvenor Films
Footage: 1361'  35 mm

BBC 35 mm print footage 1361' (15:07 @24 fps; 14:31 @25 fps)
GSPS 16 mm print footage 539.1' (14:58 @24 fps; 14:22 @25 fps) (several splices)
GSPS PAL videotape:
14:33 @ 25 fps (35 mm +9 s)

Due to closing of the Suez Canal, ships and aeroplanes had to go around Africa by the Cape. This is the story of the struggle to establish a shorter trans-Africa route. Seagoon, disguised as famous canal builder Ferdinand de Lesseps, wins a British government contract to dig a dry canal along the new route. 

Points of Interest: Electronic puppet lip-synch.

Inspired by the real-life Suez Crisis of the mid 1950s, in which giants struggled to control the world's most strategic sea route.

7/22 (SM & LS)
12
1964-06-13
The Affair of the Lone Banana [14:57]
s02e12

GSPS 16 mm print footage 538.6' (14:57 @24 fps; 14:21 @25 fps) (several splices)
GSPS PAL videotape:
14:34 @ 25 fps

In the grounds of the British Embassy in a South American republic, three heroes are dug in round the lone banana tree--the last symbol of waning British prestige.

5/5 (SM)

(see BBC Radio Collection CD, The Goon Show #7)
 

1964-06-20

(The Terrible Revenge of Fred Fu-Manchu was scheduled, but postponed to make way for cricket from Lord's)
14
1964-06-27
The Nadger Plague (15:07)
s02e14
BBC PasB log details:
27 June 1964
17.25.12 - 17.39.44 [= 14:32 @ 25 fps]
The Telegoons: The Nadger Plague: (16/63/0300)
Source: Grosvenor Films and Television Enterprises
Footage: 1361'  35 mm

BBC 35 mm print footage 1361' (15:07 @24 fps; 14:31 @25 fps)
GSPS 16 mm print footage 542.9' (15:04 @24 fps; 14:28 @25 fps) (0 splices)
GSPS PAL videotape:
14:41 @ 25 fps (35 mm +3 s)

A tale of olde and not so-merry England in which Lord Seagoon tries to escape the dreaded Nadger plague, only to end up as an 8-day chiming clock on a mantle piece!

Point of Interest: Electronic puppet lip-synch.

7/3 (SM & LS)

(see BBC Radio Collection CD, The Goon Show #20)
  1964-07-04 (not scheduled, to allow extension of Summer Grandstand)
  1964-07-11 (not scheduled, to allow extension of Summer Grandstand)
15
1964-07-18
The Siege of Fort Knight (15:07)
s02e15
BBC PasB log details:
18 July 1964
Format: 35 mm film
17.00.02 - 17.14.33 [= 14:32 @ 25 fps]
The Telegoons: The Siege of Fort Knight: (16/63/0300)
Source: Grosvenor Films and Television Enterprises
Footage: 1361'  35 mm

BBC 35 mm print footage 1361' (15:07 @24 fps; 14:31 @25 fps)
GSPS 16 mm print footage 541.9' (15:03 @24 fps; 14:27 @25 fps) (0 splices)
GSPS PAL videotape:
14:41 @ 25 fps (35 mm +4 s)

Brigadier General Lord Seagoon's story of a struggle at Fort Knight in the foothills of Wadi-El-Yu-Want, where the defenders have ample food, but nothing to cook it on.

4/30 (SM)
  1964-07-25 (Summer Grandstand)
13
1964-08-01
The Terrible Revenge of Fred Fu-Manchu [15:30]
s02e13

GSPS 16 mm print footage 512.7' (14:14 @24 fps; 13:40 @25 fps) (3 splices) -This length must be in error! Check miniDV runtime.
GSPS PAL videotape:
14:53 @ 25 fps

After losing to the British Empire in a rigged international saxophone playing contest, fiendish Fred explodes his enemies' trouser buttons, destroys all metal saxophones (27,001 of them!), and with his bamboo instrument becomes undisputed world saxophone champion. 

6/12 (SM)

The 2nd series was immediately followed by repeats of six of the first series;
BBC-1 TV, Saturdays at 1700 (first two), 1715 (next three), and 1745.
Additional PasB information is given, where it is known:

5
1964-08-08
The Last Tram 5/9 (SM & ES)
6
1964-08-15
The China Story (14:33)
BBC PasB log details:
15 August 1964
Format: 35 mm film
17.00.00 - 17.13.59 [= 13:59 @ 25 fps]
The Telegoons: China Story: (16/63/0350)
Source: Grosvenor Films
Footage 1310' 35 mm

 

5/17 (SM & ES)

TG film credits SM only

7
1964-08-22
The Canal (15:07)
BBC PasB log details:
22 August 1964
Format: 35 mm film
17.15.01 - 17.29.32 [= 14:31 @ 25 fps]
The Telegoons: The Canal: (16/63/0350)
Source: Grosvenor Films and Television Enterprises
Footage 1361' 35 mm

 

5/6 (SM)
  1964-08-29 (Summer Grandstand)
8
1964-09-05
The Choking Horror (15:08)
BBC PasB log details:
05 September 1964
Format: 35 mm film
17.16.10 - 17.30.42 [= 14:32 @ 25 fps]
The Telegoons: The Choking Horror: (16/63/0350)
Source: Grosvenor Films
Footage: 1362' 35 mm

 

6/22 (SM)
9
1964-09-12
The Hastings Flyer (15:07)
BBC PasB log details:
12 September 1964
Format: 35 mm film
17.15.00 - 17.29.31 [= 14:31 @ 25 fps]
The Telegoons: The Hastings Flyer: (16/63/0350)
Source: Grosvenor Films
Footage 1361' 35 mm 

 

6/15 (SM)
10
1964-09-19
The Mystery of the Marie Celeste-Solved 5/8 (SM & ES)

 

The Telegoons
Further Repeats from the 2nd Series
Broadcast by BBCtv

#

Broadcast

Title

Original Goon Show

10
1965-09-06
Tales of Montmartre 6/18 (SM & ES)

TG credits SM only

11
1965-09-13
The Africa Ship Canal 7/22 (SM & LS)
12
1965-09-20
The Affair of the Lone Banana 5/5 (SM)
13
1965-09-27
The Terrible Revenge of Fred Fu-Manchu 6/12 (SM)

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The Antipodean Islands (New Zealand)...

The Telegoons -- Regional NZ Broadcasts
Note: The order differs somewhat from the UK, and
varies between the four regional transmission centres.
Broadcast by NZBC (625 lines).
Dates and times as published in the NZ Listener.

AKTV-2 WNTV-1 CHTV-3 DNTV-2
Start of first
AKTV-2 series

1964-08-17
Mon 8:17 p.m.
The Ascent of Mount Everest
     
1964-08-24
Mon 8:17 p.m.
The Fear of Wages
     
1964-08-31
Mon 8:17 p.m.
Napoleon's Piano
     
1964-09-07
Mon 8:17 p.m.
The Last Tram
     
1964-09-14
Mon 8:17 p.m.
The China Story
     
1964-09-21
Mon 8:17 p.m.
The Canal
     
1964-09-28
Mon 8:17 p.m.
The Choking Horror
     
1964-10-05
Mon 8:17 p.m.
The Hastings Flyer
     
1964-10-12
Mon 8:17 p.m.
The Mystery of the Marie Celeste- Solved
  (Doctor Who premieres on NZ television, Friday, 1964-10-16, An Unearthly Child)  
1964-10-19
(No broadcast)

     
1964-10-26
Mon 8:30 p.m.
Scradge
  Start of first
CHTV-3 series

1964-10-30
Fri 8:23 p.m.
The Ascent of Mount Everest
(Right after Dr Who)
Start of first
DNTV-2 series

1964-10-26
Mon 8:27 p.m.
The Ascent of Mount Everest
1964-11-02
Mon 8:17 p.m.
The Booted Gorilla
  1964-11-06
(No broadcast)
1964-11-02
Mon 7:57 p.m.
The Fear of Wages
1964-11-09
Mon 8:17 p.m.
The Underwater Mountain
  1964-11-13
Fri 8:22 p.m.
Napoleon's Piano
1964-11-09
Mon 7:57 p.m.
The Last Tram
1964-11-16
Mon 8:17 p.m.
The Whistling Spy Enigma
  1964-11-20
Fri 8:24 p.m.
The Last Tram
1964-11-16
Mon 7:57 p.m.
The China Story
1964-11-23
Mon 8:17 p.m.
Captain Seagoon R.N.
Start of WNTV-1 series
1964-11-27
Fri 8:22 p.m.
The Ascent of Mount Everest
(Right after Dr Who)
1964-11-27
Fri 8:20 p.m.
The Fear of Wages
1964-11-23
Mon 7:57 p.m.
The Canal
1964-11-30
Mon 8:17 p.m.
Tales of Old Dartmoor
1964-12-04
Fri 8:22 p.m.
The Fear of Wages
1964-12-04
(No broadcast)
1964-11-30
Mon 7:57 p.m.
The Choking Horror
1964-12-07
Mon 8:17 p.m.
Lurgi Strikes Britain
1964-12-11
Fri 8:22 p.m.
Napoleon's Piano
1964-12-11
Fri 8:20 p.m.
The China Story
1964-12-07
Mon 7:57 p.m.
The Hastings Flyer
1964-12-14
(No broadcast)

1964-12-18
Fri 8:17 p.m.
The Last Tram
1964-12-18
Fri 7:57 p.m.
The Canal
1964-12-14
Mon 7:57 p.m.
The Mystery of the Marie Celeste- Solved
1964-12-21
Mon 8:17 p.m.
The Dreaded Batter Pudding Hurler of Bexhill-on-Sea
1965-01-25
(No broadcast)
1964-12-25
(No broadcast)
1964-12-21
Mon 7:57 p.m.
Scradge
1964-12-28
Mon 8:20 p.m.
The First Albert Memorial to the Moon
1965-01-01
Fri 8:52 p.m.
The China Story
1965-01-01
Fri 7:57 p.m.
The Choking Horror
1964-12-28
Mon 7:57 p.m.
The Booted Gorilla
1964-01-04
(No broadcast)
1965-01-08
Fri 8:47 p.m.
The Canal
1965-01-08
Fri 7:57 p.m.
The Hastings Flyer
1965-01-04
Mon 7:57 p.m.
The Underwater Mountain
Final episode of first AKTV-2 series
1965-01-11
Mon 8:17 p.m.
Tales of Montmatre
1965-01-15
Fri 9:01 p.m.
The Choking Horror
1965-01-15
Fri 7:57 p.m.
The Mystery of the Marie Celeste- Solved
1965-01-11
Mon 8:04 p.m.
The Whistling Spy Enigma
  1965-01-22
Fri 8:56 p.m.
The Hastings Flyer
1965-01-22
Fri 7:57 p.m.
Scradge
Final episode of first DNTV-2 series
1965-01-18
Mon 8:06 p.m.
Napoleon's Piano
  1965-01-29
Fri 8:50 p.m.
The Mystery of the Marie Celeste- Solved
1965-01-29
Fri 7:57 p.m.
The Booted Gorilla
 
  1965-02-05
Fri 9:21 p.m.
Scradge
1965-02-05
Fri 7:57 p.m.
The Underwater Mountain
 
  1965-02-12
Fri 9:18 p.m.
The Booted Gorilla
Final episode of first CHTV-3 series
1965-02-12
Fri 7:57 p.m.
The Whistling Spy Enigma
 
  1965-02-19
Fri 9:24 p.m.
The Underwater Mountain
   
  1965-02-26
Fri 9:20 p.m.
The Whistling Spy Enigma
   
  1965-03-05
Fri 7:15 p.m.
Captain Seagoon R.N.
   
  1965-03-12
Fri 7:15 p.m.
Tales of Old Dartmoor
   
  1965-03-19
Fri 7:15 p.m.
Lurgi Strikes Britain
   
  1965-03-26
Fri 7:16 p.m.
The Dreaded Batter Pudding Hurler of Bexhill-on-Sea
   
  1965-04-02
Fri 7:15 p.m.
The First Albert Memorial to the Moon
   
  1965-04-09
Fri 7:15 p.m.
Tales of Montmatre
   
  1965-04-16
(No broadcast)

   
  1965-04-23
Fri 7:16 p.m.
The International Christmas Pudding
   
  1965-04-30
Fri 7:15 p.m.
The Affair of the Lone Banana
   
  1965-05-07
Fri 7:14 p.m.
The Siege of Fort Knight
   
  1965-05-14
Fri 7:14 p.m.
The Terrible Revenge of Fred Fu-Manchu
   
  1965-05-21
Fri 7:15 p.m.
The Africa Ship Canal
Start of second CHTV-3 series
1965-05-21
Fri 6:23 p.m.
Captain Seagoon R.N.
Start of second DNTV-2 series
1965-05-20
Thur 6:38 p.m.
The Lost Colony
  1965-05-28
Fri 7:15 p.m.
The Lost Colony
(Billed incorrectly
as end of series)
1965-05-28
Fri 6:23 p.m.
Tales of Old Dartmoor
1965-05-27
Thur 6:38 p.m.
Captain Seagoon R.N.
  Final episode of WNTV-1 series
1965-06-04
Fri 7:15 p.m.
The Nadger Plague
1965-06-04
Fri 6:23 p.m.
The Lost Colony
1965-06-03
Thur 6:38 p.m.
Tales of Old Dartmoor
Start of second AKTV-2 series
1965-06-06
Sun 6:40 p.m.
The International Christmas Pudding
Repeat
1965-06-06
Sun 6:40 p.m.
The International Christmas Pudding
1965-06-11
Fri 6:23 p.m.
Lurgi Strikes Britain
1965-06-10
Thur 6:39 p.m.
The Dreaded Batter Pudding Hurler of Bexhill-on-Sea
1965-06-13
Sun 6:24 p.m.
The Affair of the Lone Banana
  1965-06-18
Fri 6:24 p.m.
The Dreaded Batter Pudding Hurler of Bexhill-on-Sea
1965-06-17
Thur 6:41 p.m.
The First Albert Memorial to the Moon
1965-06-20
Sun 6:07 p.m.
The Siege of Fort Knight
  1965-06-25
Fri 6:24 p.m.
The First Albert Memorial to the Moon
1965-06-24
Thur 6:39 p.m.
Tales of Montmartre
1965-06-27
(No broadcast)
  1965-07-02
Fri 6:24 p.m.
Tales of Montmartre
1965-07-01
Thur 6:40 p.m.
The International Christmas Pudding
1965-07-04
(No broadcast)
  1965-07-09
Fri 6:23 p.m.
The International Christmas Pudding
1965-07-08
Thur 6:38 p.m.
The Affair of the Lone Banana
1965-07-11
Sun 6:22 p.m.
The Lost Colony
  1965-07-16
Fri 7:15 p.m.
The Affair of the Lone Banana
1965-07-15
Thur 6:38 p.m.
The Siege of Fort Knight
1965-07-18
Sun 6:26 p.m.
The Terrible Revenge of Fred Fu-Manchu
  1965-07-23
Fri 6:23 p.m.
The Siege of Fort Knight
1965-07-22
Thur 6:38 p.m.
The Terrible Revenge of Fred Fu-Manchu
1965-07-25
Sun 6:29 p.m.
The Africa Ship Canal
  1965-07-30
Fri 6:22 p.m.
The Terrible Revenge of Fred Fu-Manchu
1965-07-29
Thur 6:39 p.m.
The Africa Ship Canal
Final episode of second AKTV-2 series
1965-08-01
Sun 6:50 p.m.
The Nadger Plague
  1965-08-06 Repeat
Fri 6:22 p.m.
The Lost Colony
1965-08-05
Thur 6:46 p.m.
The Nadger Plague
    Final episode of second CHTV-3 series
1965-08-13
Fri 6:22 p.m.
The Nadger Plague
Final episode of second DNTV-2 series
1965-08-12
Thur 6:45 p.m.
Lurgi Strikes Britain
AKTV-2 WNTV-1 CHTV-3 DNTV-2

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Australia...

The Telegoons -- Regional Aussi Broadcasts
Note: The order differs somewhat from the UK, and
varies between the six regional transmission centres.
Broadcast by ABC (625 lines).
Dates and times as published in TV Week.

Victoria NSW Queensland West Australia South Australia Tasmania
           
           
           
           
           
Six New ABV2
Shows

1964-05-02
Article in TV Week mentions The Telegoons**.
Currently screening
on ABV1, as of  1964-05-02
       
Screening starting
soon on ABV2, as of
1964-05-02
Br. TV Comedy
is Booming

1964-05-02
Article in TV Week mentions The Telegoons*.
       
          1964-10-23
Fri 8:05 p.m.
Unknown Episode
(Hobart ABT2;
Lauceston ABNT3)
           
           
Victoria NSW Queensland West Australia South Australia Tasmania

 * British TV Comedy is BoomingTV Week, May 2, 1964, pp. 74-77.
   "The most off-beat television comedy show this season has been The Telegoons.
    The cream of 500 scripts from the old radio Goon Show was skimmed for a 26-episode
    series, with the famous Goon characters like Neddy Seagoon, Eccles, Grytpipe Thynne,
    Moriarty and Minnie Bannister portrayed by puppets. Voices were provided by the
    original Goons--Spike Milligan, Peter Sellers and Harry Secombe.
    The ingenious idea of presenting the Goons as puppets paid off, because the little
    puppet characters supply just the right air of fantasy that was the essence of the
    radio Goon Show."

**Six New ABV2 Shows. TV Week, May 2, 1964, pp. 74-77.
 "The Telegoons is only a 15-minute cartoon series, but it's laced with all the crazy
   humor that made England's Goon Show a top-rated radio program.
   The Goons--Peter Sellers, Harry Secombe and Spike Milligan--are heard but
   not seen. Producer Tony Young has used a blend of string and rod puppets, a
   combination possible only on film. String figures are used in action scenes, but
   in close-up rod puppets are used."

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Key to Abbreviations and Notation:

SM   --  Spike Milligan
LS    --  Larry Stephens
ES    --  Eric Sykes
JG    --  Jimmy Grafton
PasB -- This refers to the BBC's Programme-as-Broadcast log.
             PasB times may differ from those given in the BBC's Radio Times
             television programme guide, and represent the actual time of broadcast.
[  ]   --   Square brackets generally indicate data that has been corrected or estimated.

Notes:

Acknowledgement of Sources:

The UK Telegoons chronology was first published in The Goon Show Companion, by Roger Wilmut and Jimmy Grafton. 
The NZ Telegoons chronology was derived from programme listings in The New Zealand Listener
The Australian Telegoons chronology will hopefully be derived from programme listings in TV Week.
The episode summaries are based on various sources, including The New Zealand Listener, several Goon Show web sites, and my own observations.


Film Credits...

Out of the twenty six original Goon Show scripts chosen, thirteen were by Spike Milligan, seven were by Spike Milligan and Larry Stephens (one of which was also edited by Jimmy Grafton), and six were by Spike Milligan and Eric Sykes.

Adapted for television puppet format by Maurice Wiltshire.

Puppet Voices:     Spike Milligan
                            Harry Secombe
                            Peter Sellers

Puppets developed by Ron Field (uncredited) and Ralph Dawson Young (Ralph Young is also credited as Animation Controller and Designer for the modified pilot film. However, since Ralph's only possible such contribution could have been for the new 1:38 opening scene, this credit should have gone to Ron Field).
Electronic puppet lip-synch developed by Ron Field of Ron and Joan Field's Marionettes (uncredited).
Settings designed by Stanley Moore (also credited as art director in the pilot).
Scenery and properties by Stage Decor Ltd.
Music by Edward White.
Film processed by Kays Laboratories Ltd.

Abbreviations and names used in the film credits chart, below:

AF = Ann Field (daughter of Ron Field)
(now Ann Perrin)
JP = Jane Phillips
BB = Robert (Bob) Bucknell LH = Len Harris
BF = William (Bill) Freshman MF = Mike Fox
BM = Bert Marotta MW = Michael (Mike) Wilson
CB = Cyril Brown PG = Philip (Phil) Grindrod
DD = Doreen Dearnaley (Tony Young's wife) PK = Pauline Klotz
DP = Dudley Plummer PR = Pat Ronald
DS = Doreen Soan RF = Ron Field
DY = David Young RY = Ralph Young
HO = Harry Orchard TT = Terry Thompson
JD = John Dudley TY = Tony Young
JE = Jock Egon VP = Violet Phelan (now Violet Philpott)
JF = Joan Field  WD = Wendy Danielli
JG = Joan Garrick

Prod# = Production number.
AP
= Associate Producer.
Prod
= Producer.
Dir = Director.
DP = Director of Photography.
LC
= Lighting Cameraman.
PM
= Production Manager (also Production Supervisor).
Ed = Film Editor.
CO
= Camera Operator.
Sound = Sound Engineer.
DM = Dubbing Mixer = Dubbing Editor.
Cont = Continuity
PS = Puppets Supervisor 

The following chart is arranged in filming order, rather than the order in which the episodes were originally broadcast.

Title

BBCtv
Series,
Episode

Date
Filmed

Prod
#

AP P
r
o
d
D
i
r
DP LC PM Ed CO S
o
u
n
d
DM C
o
n
t
PS Puppeteers

Short test film
n/a Late 1959 or early
1960
n/a   WD TY                    

The Lost Colony - Introducing The Telegoons¤
(Runtime 33:00)

n/a Feb
8 - 13
1960
Pilot -- WD TY HO -- -- BB MW -- CB DD§ -- RF, JF, AF
The Lost Colony - Introducing The Telegoons
(Runtime 15:00)
s01, e02 Opening sequence: Probably during week of
Jan 7-11
1963
0 -- WD TY HO -- -- BB MW -- CB DD§ -- Pilot: RF§, JF§, AF§

Opening Sequence (Columbus):
(RY*),
JP¤¤, JG¤¤,
PR¤¤
(linking scene): JD
§
1st filming series:                (Puppet lip-synch was done manually for all episodes in the 1st filming series)
The China Story s01, e06 Jan
14-18
1963
1 WD TY TY PG -- BM BB MW DP CB DS DY JD, AF, VP
The Affair of the Lone Banana s02, e12 Jan
21-25
1963
2 WD TY BF PG -- BM BB MW DP CB DS DY JD, AF, VP
The International Christmas Pudding s01, e11 Jan 28
-Feb 1
1963
3 WD TY TY PG -- BM BB MW DP CB DS DY JD, AF, VP
The Underwater Mountain s02, e03 Feb
4-8
1963
4 WD TY BF PG -- BM BB MW DP CB DS DY JD, AF, VP
The Mystery
of the Marie-Celeste
-Solved!
s01, e10 Feb
11-15
1963
5 WD TY TY PG -- BM BB MW DP CB DS DY JD, AF, VP
The First Albert Memorial to the
Moon
s02, e08 Feb
18-22
1963
6 WD TY BF PG -- BM BB MW DP CB DS DY JD, AF, VP
Tales of
Montmartre
s02, e10 Feb
25p-28
1963
7 WD TY TY PG -- BM BB MW DP CB DS DY JD, AF, VP
The Canal s01, e07 March
4-8
1963
8 WD TY BF PG -- BM BB MW DP CB DS DY JD, AF, VP
The Siege of
Fort Knight
or The Underwater
Gas Stove
s02, e15 March
11-15a
1963
9 WD TY TY PG -- BM BB MW DP CB DS DY JD, AF, VP
The Booted Gorilla s02, e02 March 15p-21
1963
10 WD TY TY PG -- BM BB MW DP CB DS DY JD, AF, VP
The Terrible
Revenge of
Fred Fu-Manchu
s02, e13 March
22-27a
1963
11 WD TY TY PG -- BM BB MW DP CB DS DY JD, AF, VP
Napoleon's
Piano
s01, e04 March 27p
 - April 3
& April 26
1963
12 WD TY BF PG -- BM BB MW DP CB DS DY JD, AF, VP
The Last Tram s01, e05 April
4-10
1963
13 WD TY TY PG -- BM BB MW DP CB DS DY JD, VP
2nd filming series:             (Automatic puppet lip-synch was used for for all episodes in the 2nd filming series)
The Ascent of
Mount Everest
s01, e01 April
11-19a
1963
N.14 WD TY TY PG -- BM BB MW DP CB DS DY JD, VP
The Fear of Wages s01, e03 April
19p-25
1963
O.15 WD TY BF PG -- BM BB MW DP CB DS DY JD, VP
The Hastings Flyer s01, e09 April 29
-May 3
1963
P.16 WD TY TY PG -- BM BB MW DP CB DS DY JD, TT, JE, VP§§
The Dreaded Batter-Pudding Hurler of Bexhill-on-Sea s02, e04 May
6-10
1963
Q.17 WD TY TY ** MW BM BB MF DP CB DS DY JD, TT, JE
Scradge s02, e01 May
13-17
1963?
R.18? WD TY TY ** MW BM BB MF DP CB DS DY TT, JE, PK
The Whistling Spy Enigma s02, e09 May
20-24
1963?
S.19? WD TY TY ** MW BM BB MF DP CB DS DY TT, JE, PK
The Choking Horror s01, e08 May
27-31
1963?
T.20? WD TY TY PG -- BM BB MW DP CB DS DY TT, JE, PK
Tales of Old Dartmoor s02, e05 June
3-7
1963?
U.21? WD TY TY PG -- BM BB MW DP CB DS DY TT, JE, PK
Lurgi Strikes Britain s02, e06 June
10-14
1963?
V.22? WD TY TY PG -- BM BB MW DP CB DS DY TT, JE, PK
Captain
Seagoon R.N.
s02, e07 June
17-21
1963?
W.23? WD TY TY PG -- BM BB MW DP CB DS DY TT, JE, PK
The Africa Ship Canal s02, e11 June
24-28
1963?
X.24? WD TY MW PG -- BM BB LH DP CB DS DY TT, JE, PK
The Nadger Plague s02, e14 July
8-12
1963?
Y.25? WD TY MW PG -- BM BB LH DP CB DS DY TT, JE, PK

Title

BBCtv
Series,
Episode

Date
Filmed

Prod
#

AP P
r
o
d
D
i
r
DP LC PM Ed CO S
o
u
n
d
DM C
o
n
t
PS Puppeteers

Notes:
The yellow high-lighted dates in the "Date Filmed" column have been verified against actual shooting schedules, or other documentary evidence of the actual dates. The other dates have been calculated by allowing one week of five working days for each film. 
The grey high-lighting on production episodes 1 - 12 indicates those episodes where the voices were recorded prior to Peter Sellers joining the project. Although Peter went back after all the episodes were recorded and redubbed his parts for the first twelve episodes, there is sound evidence (pun intended) that some parts were left in the voice of the stand-in, whose identity we still don't know. It is also possible that Spike Milligan helped the stand-in cover Peter's wide range of characters.

¤ The pilot film, The Lost Colony (1960), at 33 minutes was more than twice as long as the series episodes that would follow. This was due not only to the pilot's use of the original radio Goon Show recording, The Sale of Manhattan (G.S. s06e11), for the soundtrack (approximately 27 minutes without the musical interludes), but also the relative slowness of the puppets. This latter problem, for which there was no practical solution, would have basically killed Tony Young's original proposal to reuse the BBC's Goon Show recordings for the series, had the BBC not decided to block the use of them anyway. After one false start, in which the BBC turned the proposal down flat, second time round they were found to be interested after all. Subsequently, BBCtv made an advance to Grosvenor Films, enough to produce the first thirteen of the twenty-six 15-minute episodes, with more funding to follow. 
  
¤¤ The 2nd broadcast episode, The Lost Colony (s01e02, 1963), was a modified version (heavily cut, and with a new sound track) of the 1960 pilot film of the same name. Of the pilot film itself (which was 33 minutes long), there are no known copies extant, and we can only presume that, as shown to the BBC, it correctly credited Ron, Joan, and Ann Field for the puppetry, as well as Ron Field and Ralph Young for the puppet design and construction. Yet the screen credits in the 15-minute 1963 broadcast version of the pilot do not mention the Field family at all, which is puzzling, especially considering that they were well known professional puppeteers. What's more, nowhere does the word puppeteer appear in the revised pilot's credits, and herein lies a clue to an intrigue (to be further discussed in the Film Production section). What the credits do say is that Ralph Young (co-developer of the puppets, but not one of the puppeteers) was Animation Controller and designer. The credits also list Jane Phillips (a professional puppeteer), Joan Garrick (a professional  puppeteer), and Pat Ronald (no details known) as assistants to Ralph Young. Had Joan Garrick et al. been credited as puppeteers, there would certainly have been major trouble, especially since their contribution to the puppetry consisted solely of the 1:28 opening sequence, designed to warm up the audience (a rather amusing scene involving Henry Crun as a reporter interviewing Moriarty as Christopher Columbus). Following the departure of these new puppeteers, who must have been employed for no more than a day, a short (10 second) linking scene was added at the end of the Columbus sequence. The puppet manipulation for this latter scene (which shows Grytpype-Thynne in his soon-to-be-familiar role as announcer for the series) was done by John Dudley (uncredited), and was the first job he did upon joining the production in early January 1963.

The credits in subsequent episodes say Puppets designed and constructed by Ralph Young (again omitting Ron Field), but do list the puppeteers, essentially correctly, including twelve episodes credited to puppeteer Ann Field.
  
* Any commercial release of The Telegoons needs to take care of some major discrepancies in the film credits. For example, Ralph Young is credited as Animation Controller and Designer for the modified pilot. But Ralph's contribution could be no more than the new 1:38 opening sequence. In the actual pilot (which was 33 minutes long), this role and responsibility went to Ron Field. Therefore, since 90% of the footage in the modified pilot film is directly from the pilot, the Animation Controller and Designer credit should rightly have been given to Ron Field. Also, due to Ron's role as inventor of the (patented) electronic lip-synch system used in later episodes (which includes pliable faces that reproduce natural speech movements), the series episode credits should say Puppets designed and constructed by Ron Field and Ralph Young (in that order). Despite Tony Young's often-repeated claim that the puppets were designed and constructed by his father Ralph alone (a view probably designed to serve Tony's legal maneuverings rather than historians), there is some opinion that Ralph's screen credit should more properly have been Design Consultant. Perhaps the truth of the matter (and the view that I have taken) is somewhere in-between. Whatever the case may be, Ralph Young does seem to have had a major role as the driving force behind Tony Young, although no one was quite sure who was driving whom, father or son!

Ron, Joan, and Ann Field were the puppeteers for the pilot (uncredited). The puppeteers mentioned in the modified pilot contributed only 1:28 of footage out of 15 minutes. So to be fair, both set of names should be mentioned, with the Fields first. (See the above footnote for more discussion).
  
** Phil Grindrod was ill in hospital during these episodes.
  
§ Uncredited.
  
§§ Uncredited. Several photos show Violet Phelan working on The Hastings Flyer episode, which was her actual last episode, not Fear of Wages.
  
? Filming order not known for the last eight episodes.
  
?? The pilot was filmed over Monday Feb 8 - Saturday Feb 13, 1960. The venue was a rented hall.
  
p Started in the afternoon (p.m.)
  
n/a Not applicable
  

 

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